What Works on Wall Street : A Guide to the Best-Performing Investment Strategies of All Time

August 12, 2015 - Comment

“A major contribution . . . on the behavior of common stocks in the United States.” –Financial Analysts’ Journal The consistently bestselling What Works on Wall Street explores the investment strategies that have provided the best returns over the past 50 years–and which are the top performers today. The third edition of this BusinessWeek and

Buy Now! $22.00Amazon.com Price
(as of August 18, 2019 11:53 pm UTC - Details)

“A major contribution . . . on the behavior of common stocks in the United States.”
–Financial Analysts’ Journal

The consistently bestselling What Works on Wall Street explores the investment strategies that have provided the best returns over the past 50 years–and which are the top performers today. The third edition of this BusinessWeek and New York Times bestseller contains more than 50 percent new material and is designed to help you reshape your investment strategies for both the postbubble market and the dramatically changed political landscape.

Packed with all-new charts, data, tables, and analyses, this updated classic allows you to directly compare popular stockpicking strategies and their results–creating a more comprehensive understanding of the intricate and often confusing investment process. Providing fresh insights into time-tested strategies, it examines:

Value versus growth strategies P/E ratios versus price-to-sales Small-cap investing, seasonality, and more

Comments

JP Reeder says:

New edition, new data. I work with Jim O’Shaughnessy and I would just like to clarify Mr. McMahan’s comment on the data in the new edition. The newest edition of What Works on Wall Street does in fact contain updated data through the end of 2003. The prior editions were through 1994 and 1996, so in addition to new series, monthly analysis and several new chapters there are also seven more years of data. 

David Merkel "Aleph Blog" says:

Book Review from the Aleph Blog This book was really popular in 1996, when it was published. James O’Shaughnessy gained access to the S&P Compustat database, and tested a wide variety of investment strategies to see which ones worked the best over a 43-year period. Unlike most books I will review at my site, this one does not get wholehearted approval from me. My background in econometrics makes me skeptical of some of the conclusions drawn by the book. There are several valuable things to learn from the book, which I will…

Philip Steinmeyer says:

Interesting data, questionable utility for most I am of mixed opinion on this book. I think it’s probably a 4-star for me, but likely to be less useful (thus deserving a lower rating) for many others. 

Comments are disabled for this post.